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Student Achievements

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BPS 2020 Art Contest Winner : Fiona Naughton

Fiona Naughton, post-doctoral scholar working with Dr. Oliver Beckstein, won first place in the Art of Science Image Contest at this year's annual BPS (BioPhysical Society) meeting with her illustration, “If Proteins Were Cats.” The Art of Science Image Contest is a feature every year, with approximately 10 finalists chosen to display their work in an open exhibit. Winners are determined by the vote of the conference attendees. “Often, the entries are more directly obtained in the course of research, and I was a bit worried people might find a cat sketch too silly or irrelevant — so I was happy to know that people had liked it and really excited to win first place!” Naughton said. “It was great to see the effort I'd put into it pay off.”

Other news

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CBP Faculty member Professor Douglas Shepherd is the featured presenter for the August 24 Physics Colloqium

Thursday, August 24th Dr. Shepherd will give his talk on Exploring the 'Rules of Life' Through Optical Microscopy. Physics Colloquia is held in PSF 101 at 3:30-4:30pm. 

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CBP Faculty member Professor Oliver Beckstein is the featured presenter for the August 17 Physics Colloqium

The first Physics Colloquium of the Fall 2023 semester is scheduled for Thursday, August 17th. Dr. Oliver Beckstein will give his talk on From the Wiggling of Atoms to Fundamental Biological processes via Multiscale Modeling. Physics Colloquia is held in PSF 101 at 3:30-4:30pm. 

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New study brings medicine closer to non-addictive painkillers

Powerful opiate drugs are a mainstay in modern medicine, alleviating pain in both acute and chronic forms. These charms however, bear a curse. Users quickly develop tolerance to their effects, requiring ever-increasing doses of the drug. Further, such opioid compounds lead to drug dependence, owing to their notoriously addictive qualities.

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Life in motion: ASU biophysics trains students in a young field

The biophysics program at Arizona State University mirrors the field itself in both its interdisciplinary breadth and its youth. Biology, under one historical name or another, dates back to the beginning of science, at least as far back as Aristotle’s work in physiology and his categorization of plant and animal species. Physics has an equally long history; coincidentally, Aristotle was also the first to call the study of motion “physics,” thereby giving the field the name that has lasted in English to modern times.

Physics News